Volunteers Needed for DSHS Fieldwork

There is an opportunity for volunteers to participate in the archeological excavations at the Drennen-Scott Historic Site during 12 specific days in April.

 

The Drennen-Scott Historic Site, operated by the University of Arkansas - Fort Smith, is located at 221 N. 3rd St. in Van Buren and is a museum as well as a teaching classroom and lab.

 

Dates available for volunteers are April 10-11, 13-14, 17-19 and 24-28. The work will take place from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Volunteers must reserve a time and day and must commit to at least three hours. No experience is necessary, but space is limited. Children must be at least 10 years old and, if under 16 years old, must be accompanied by an adult volunteer at all times.

 

Reservations may be made by contacting Tim Mulvihill of the UAFS Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey at UAFS, by email at Tim.Mulvihill@uafs.edu or by telephone at 479-788-7812. More details will be provided once reservations are made.

 

Students in the Introduction to Archeology class at UAFS will conduct ongoing excavations during the first two weeks of April. Mulvihill said the work by volunteers will be a continuation of what has already been taking place at the site.

 

“Excavations to date have focused on identifying the extent of foundations for structures that once occupied the backyard, locating other backyard features and determining the dates of various deposits,” he said. “We will continue with this work during this field session.”

 

UAFS received several grants which covered the purchase of the Drennen home and acreage as well as funds to complete the work on the home. In all, UAFS received more than $5 million toward the project.

 

The home was purchased from descendants of John Drennen and Charles Scott --Caroline Bercher of Lavaca, Scott Bulloch of Van Buren and Drennen Bulloch of Little Rock. The three are fifth-generation descendants of the home's original owner, John Drennen.

 

John Drennen was a founder of Van Buren, politician, Indian agent, landowner and businessman. Charles Scott was Drennen's business partner who eventually became interested in seekingDrennen's eldest daughter's hand in marriage. Charles and Caroline Scott inherited control of the estate after Drennen's death in 1855.

 

The Drennen-Scott Historic Site opened to the public in May 2011.

 

Date Posted: 
Wednesday, March 13, 2013
News Teaser: 
There is an opportunity for volunteers to participate in the archeological excavations at the Drennen-Scott Historic Site during 12 specific days in April.